Out-of-School Time Policy Commentary

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Out-of-School Time Policy Commentary #1: Out-of-School Research Meets After-School Policy

The past five years have seen a ground swell in public attention and public policy aimed at increasing the availability of after-school programs for children and young teens during the "risk" hours when safety, supervision and homework are of top concern.

2002-10-01
Out-of-School Time Policy Commentary #2: High School After-School: What Is It? What Might It Be? Why Is It Important?

High school is becoming the next frontier for after-school advocates. The conceptual and practical leaps from programming for elementary and middle school students to high school students are significant, and the marketing challenges are huge.

2003-03-01
Out-of-School Time Policy Commentary #3: Reflections on System Building: Lessons from the After-School Movement

On February 3, 2003, the Bush Administration unveiled its request to cut funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program by 40 percent in fiscal year 2004.

2003-05-01
Out-of-School Time Policy Commentary #4: After-School for All? Exploring Access and Equity in After-School Programs

While significant progress has occurred over the past several years in terms of expanding both the quantity and quality of after-school opportunities, the ambitious idea of “after-school for all” remains a distant goal.

2003-07-01
Out-of-School Time Policy Commentary #5: Inside the Black Box: Exploring the "Content" of After-School

How do effective programs deliver academic content? Can after-school programs help students master a broader base of content? What strategies can help programs and systems deliver content effectively? What is realistic to expect of programs? Program content is closely linked with our understandings about the purpose of after-school programming.

2003-11-01
Out-of-School Time Policy Commentary #6: Participation during Out-of-School Time: Taking a Closer Look

This commentary examines the issue of youth participation in out-of-school time programs from two perspectives. It begins broadly and with a youth-centered lens, by asking how children and youth spend their discretionary time and how time use patterns relate to outcomes.

2004-05-01
Out-of-School Time Policy Commentary #7: School's Out: A Look at Summer Learning and Engagement

The word summer brings to mind images of a relaxed, unstructured season – a time markedly different from other seasons of the year. In the United States we have a particularly entrenched notion that summer is different – a notion reflected in popular assumptions about summer as a “break” and reinforced by carefree depictions of summer that abound in popular culture.

2004-07-01
Out-of-School Time Policy Commentary #8: Out-of-School Time and Civic Engagement

The non-school hours, often framed as periods of risk, idleness or remediation, in fact constitute a powerful opportunity for civic renewal, engagement and change. This commentary describes how out-of-school time programs make ideal contexts for nurturing civic engagement, exploring the issue from the practice, research and policy perspectives.

2004-10-01
Out-of-School Time Policy Commentary #9: When School Is Out, Museums, Parks and Libraries Are In

Parks, libraries, museums and other cultural organizations represent a diverse array of assets and share a broad mission to serve their communities, however, some may not realize the roles that these institutions can and do play in supporting young people during out-of-school time hours.

2005-01-01
Out-of-School Time Policy Commentary #10: Rethinking the High School Experience: What's After-School Got to Do With it?

With high school reform now a front-burner issue, districts and communities cannot afford to have high school after-school on the back burner.

2005-08-26